Keynote Speech


Title Tribology & Manufacturing
Speaker Prof. Farshid Sadeghi
Affiliation Purdue University
Editor-in-Chief of Society of Tribologists and Lubrication
Engineers (STLE), Tribology Transactions (TT)
Time/ Location 10/01 (Wed.) 9:15 AM at International Hall, Auditorium
Farshid Sadeghi is the Cummins Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University. He received his B.S. and M.S. from the University of Tennessee and his Ph.D. in 1986 from the North Carolina State University. In 1986 he joined the School of Mechanical Engineering at Purdue University and founded the Mechanical Engineering Tribology Laboratory (METL). His research interest include: tribology, micromechanics, fatigue, and micro-electro-mechanical-sensors for tribological applications. He has authored and/or co-authored more than 125 archival publications in leading international journals and has given over 250 presentations and invited seminars at various conferences, industries, governmental agencies and universities. He has received three patents and published four book chapters.

Professor Sadeghi has graduated 62 PhD and M.S. students, currently serving as the chairman of 9 Ph.D. and 3 M.S. students. He has chaired, co-chaired and/or organized over 50 sessions at international conferences and served as the chairman of the 2000 ASME Tribology Conference in Seattle, Washington. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE), Tribology Transactions (TT). TT is the leading and oldest tribology journal in the world. Professor Sadeghi has received more than 24 million Dollars in research grants and contracts from government agencies (NSF, Navy, Air Force, NASA, etc.) and industrial companies (Cummins, CAT, Timken, FAG, Ford, Schaeffler Group, Kaydon, RR, Honeywell, etc.). He is a fellow of ASME and STLE. He has received numerous awards for his research and teaching. Among the recent notable awards that he has received are: i) 2012 Purdue University, College of Engineering Research Excellence Award, ii) 2011 American Society of Mechanical Engineers Mayo D. Hersey Award and iii) 2011 Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers (STLE) International Award.

In this presentation the history of tribology and its relevance to manufacturing will be discussed. The various manufacturing processes and how these processes will affect bearing performance will be reviewed. The presentation will also discuss in depth the effect manufacturing material inclusion on rolling contact fatigue.

Non-metallic inclusions such as sulfides and oxides are byproducts of the steel manufacturing process. For more than half a century, researchers have observed microstructural alterations around the inclusions commonly referred to as "butterfly-wings". This presentation proposes a model to describe butterfly-wing formation around non-metallic inclusions. A 2D finite element model is developed to obtain the stress distribution in a domain subject to Hertzian loading with an embedded non-metallic inclusion. It was found that mean stress due to surface traction has a significant effect on butterfly formation. Continuum damage mechanics (CDM) was used to investigate fatigue damage and replicate the observed butterfly wing formations. It is postulated that cyclic damage accumulation can be the reason for the microstructural changes in butterflies. A new damage evolution equation which accounts for the effect of mean stresses was introduced to capture the microstructural changes in the material. The proposed damage evolution law matches experimentally observed butterfly orientation, shape, and size successfully. The model is used to obtain S-N results for butterfly formation at different Hertzian load levels. The results corroborate well with the experimental data available in the open literature. The model is used to predict debonding at the inclusion/matrix interface and the most vulnerable regions for crack initiation on butterfly sides. The proposed model is capable of predicting the regions of interest in corroboration with experimental observations.



Title Towards Next-Generation Machining and Machine Tool Technologies
Speaker Prof. Eiji Shamoto
Affiliation Nagoya University
Time/ Location 9/30 (Tue.) 14:00 PM at International Hall, Auditorium
Professor Eiji Shamoto obtained his Bachelor (1984), Master (1986) and Ph.D. (1989) degrees from Nagoya University, Japan. He worked in Kobe University, Japan, as a research associate from 1989 and became an associate professor in Kobe University (1994). During his career in Kobe, he has stayed in Canada as a visiting researcher for one year (1995-1996), working in University of British Columbia. Professor Shamoto has been working in Nagoya University as a professor since 2002. His research interest includes material removal processes, machine tool dynamics and control, actuators and precision machine elements. He has authored and/or co-authored more than 100 archival journal articles and has given over 200 invited presentations and seminars at various conferences, industries, foundations and universities. He has published more than 10 book chapters and received more than 20 patents. Many of the invented and developed technologies have been utilized in Industry, e.g. "Elliptical Vibration Cutting" is widely utilized for ultraprecision/micro die/mold machining, and "Speed-Differing Multi-Milling" is recently utilized for mass production of precision steel plates.

Professor Shamoto has graduated more than 50 PhD and M.S. students, currently serving as the chairman of 6 Ph.D. and 4 M.S. students. He has chaired, co-chaired and/or organized over 30 sessions at international conferences and served as the chairman of the 3rd CIRP Conference on Process Machine Interactions (PMI 2012) in Nagoya, Japan. He is a fellow of CIRP and JSME. He has received numerous awards for his research. The recent notable awards that he has received are: i) 2014 The 3rd International Conference on Virtual Machining Process Technology, Outstanding Paper Award, ii) 2013 The Japan Society for Precision Engineering, JSPE Best Paper Award, and iii) 2012 The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers, JSME Medal for Outstanding Paper.

New machining and machine tool technologies, which have been developed in Ultraprecicion Engineering Laboratory of Nagoya University, are introduced, including "Elliptical Vibration Cutting", "Speed-Differing Multi-Milling", "Chip-Guiding Cutting", and "Analytical Method to Predict Contact Stiffness and Friction Damping". The elliptical vibration cutting technology has realized ultraprecision/micro machining of difficult-to-cut materials, and it is commercialized mainly for precision die/mold machining. The speed-differing multi-milling technology improves machining efficiency and accuracy significantly by suppressing regenerative chatter vibration in multi-milling with a flexible structure, and it is utilized for mass production of precision steel plates. The chip-guiding cutting technology has recently been proposed to avoid chip jamming, and it is expected that it will not only achieve the avoidance but also reduce cutting force/temperature by combining chip-pulling technology. The analytical method to predict contact stiffness and friction damping has just been developed, which will open up doors to achieve fully analytical prediction of dynamic behavior of machines as well as maximization of their damping capacities.